The Bud

I was recently at a women’s writing group where we watched a performance by Lizzo, a voluptuous, female pop-star, expressing an uninhibited freedom to the masses with her sexy, voluptuous body. She strikingly exuded self-confidence, unabashedly allowing her whole being to shine while she sang and danced on the stage. From her example, I felt a sense of permission to break free from my own limited body images formed early in childhood and the narrow images of beauty often displayed on TV, the front covers of magazines, and the modeling my mother demonstrated. I was taught early in life that thin was the goal and that it was going to be a struggle to reach that goal. Lizzo’s ability to comfortably inhabit her female form spoke to the capacity we each have within us to accept our unique body and genius–to let go of the chains of cultural conditioning, to stop comparing ourselves to other people’s bodies, and to claim our inherent “Bud” of beauty.

What is a Bud? 

One definition, is a form put forth in a small growth that develops into a flower, leaf, or branch.

Saint Francis’s wise words on a Bud:

“The Bud stands for all things, even for those things that don’t flower, for everything flowers from within, of self-blessings; though sometimes it is necessary to reteach a thing its loveliness, to put a hand on the brow of the flower and retell it in words and in touch that it is lovely until it flowers again from within, of self blessing.  As Saint Francis put his hand on the creased forehead of the sow, and told her in words and in touch blessings of earth on the sow, and the sow began remembering all down her thick length, from the earthen snout all the way through the fodder and slopes to the spiritual curl of her tail . . . the long, perfect loveliness of sow.”

How does this relate to your health?  In every way. 

The Bud cannot be, if we do not put ourselves beyond the limiting images and beliefs of our childhood, culture, and self.  If you have forgotten how lovely you are, let someone remind you.  You deserve to feel good!

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Healthy Herbal Coolers

Healthy Herbal Teas That keep You Hydrated in the Heat

Here in Southern Oregon the heat is upon us and the summer is just getting started.  In this post Oliver Leonetti L.Ac,  the owner of Inner Gate Acupuncture in Portland Oregon, shares two great tea recipes that use Chinese herbs to help keep you hydrated and healthy this summer.

Summer is a great time to be outside enjoying the landscape and beauty that Southern Oregon has to offer. Here are two natural recipes with Chinese herbs for real thirst quenching. These herbs have heat relieving and hydrating properties that are far better than over-sweetened commercial products.

These teas are great for hikes, workouts or just as daily thirst quenchers. These can be brewed at home and transported in reusable bottles to limit the environmental impact of plastics. These teas also provide electrolytes and minerals to replace those lost through perspiration and activity.

Mint and Chrysanthemum Tea:

Ingredients:
1 cup – Mint leaves – Dried or fresh.
1 cup – Dried Chrysanthemum flowers

Directions: 
Bring 4 cups of water to boil and remove from the heat.
Add herbs and steep for about 10 minutes.
Strain herbs
Add 6 cups of water or ice.
A natural sweetener or fresh mint can be added for taste.

Notes:
Mint is traditionally used to clear heat from the head and eyes. Its cooling nature helps relieve heat rashes and headaches.

Chrysanthemum is traditionally used to lessen allergy symptoms, reduce fevers, headaches and relieve red swollen eyes. 

Goji Melon Cooler:

Ingredients:

1 cup     Goji berries 
2 cups – Watermelon juice
2 cups – Aloe vera juice

Directions:
Bring 4 cups of water to a boil.
Reduce to a simmer
Add goji berries and simmer for 10 minutes
Strain herbs and allow it too cool fully
Add Aloe juice and watermelon
Add 5 cups of water or ice
A natural sweetener or fresh mint can be added for taste.

Notes:
Goji Berries are a great all-around tonic. They have been used traditionally to strengthen the body and the eyes and they are full of vitamins and minerals.
Watermelon, especially the white rind part, has great cooling and hydrating properties. It is used traditionally to reduce heat stroke.
Aloe Vera Juice has been traditionally used for cooling the body and skin. It’s also great for constipation, and red eyes.

Enjoy!

Click Here to learn more about Oliver Leonetti L.Ac. and Inner Gate Acupuncture

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Playing the Game

 
by Clark Zimmerman, L.Ac.

One of the first games that my daughter learned to play was Candyland.  She could sit for hours picking cards and moving around the board; she loved the colors and the pictures of sweets.  Unlike most people who play board games, she didn’t know that the object was to get to the gingerbread house and “win”.  In fact, if she were nearing the end of the rainbow path, she would start to get worried that the game would soon be over. She would get excited if she drew the Candy Cane or Gingerbread card that took her back to the beginning.  She simply loved playing the game.

    Sometime in our childhoods, most of us start to get more competitive.  Maybe it is an offshoot of evolution.  For millennia, the winner in the game of life got to survive and pass on their genes, whereas the loser would perish.  Whatever the reason, at some point we typically begin playing more to win than to enjoy the game.  While there is nothing wrong with wanting to win, a lot of times we come up on the losing side of the game.  If we happen to lose, does that take all of the fun out of the time we spent playing the game?  If so, it seems that the game would appear to be a waste of time.
 
    This makes me think of playing cards–I used to play a lot of cards.  One of my favorite games was Euchre, which is a game similar to Bridge.  In my 20s, I used to take it pretty seriously.  My friends and I would have Euchre tournaments in which the prize was bragging rights.  Some of the games got really heated.  I remember getting upset when my partner didn’t play the right strategy, or when the cards wouldn’t fall my way.  Eventually I began to see the absurdity in this approach to the game.  When I became less attached to winning a funny thing happened: instead of having the overall quality of my night depend on what the scorecards read, I began to enjoy the conversation more. I started to enjoy the company more.  I even began cheering on my opponent when he got a really good hand or made an especially good play of the cards.  My ability to have fun on Euchre nights was greatly improved.  

    This is similar to life in general.  We often think of “winning” as finishing or succeeding.  We may think that we will win once we reach retirement, or when we finally purchase that certain car.  When we orient ourselves towards such goals, we look so far ahead that we miss the moment. Though it can be helpful to have goals, we must be careful not to define happiness or success by these measurements alone.  If we forget that the present moment is all we truly have, we are constantly motivated by our clinging to the past or desire for a certain future.  This is a recipe for suffering.  Sometimes things go the way we want them to go, sometimes they do not.  It is often the case that even when we get to the goal that we have dreamed about, whether we retire or get that dream car, the “success” that we experience eventually seems hollow or less grand than we imagined it would be.  When we untether our happiness from a certain outcome we allow the fullness of life to express itself in beautifully unexpected ways.  We make it less about winning and more about enjoying the game. Then the real winner is the one who has the most fun.  The real winner is the one who fully plays the game.
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