Recycling and Awareness

by Clark Zimmerman, LAc.

Like most people, I was surprised to hear that some big changes were coming to recycling in the Rogue valley.   After years of taking most of our recyclable materials, China has decided that it no longer can fill the role of Americas recycling center.  It appears that they are awash in tons of our old packaging and containers.  What was once a marginally profitable industry has now begun to steadily lose money.  I must admit that surprise is not the only thing I experienced:  I found myself annoyed, then saddened, then ashamed and ultimately hopeful.  I was annoyed that a convenience that I had taken for granted was being taken away. I was saddened to think of all the extra plastic and paper would be going to the landfill.  I was ashamed to think how I had become increasingly unconscious of all of the unnecessary packaging that I had accepted as part of life.  Finally, I became hopeful that this was the sort of event that bring more awareness to an issue that needs more action and less complacency.

We live in a world that is increasingly inundated by plastic and other waste.  I read an article about the “great pacific garbage patch” last week that said there is a collection of plastic in the pacific ocean that is twice the size of Texas…That’s really BIG.  Unfortunately the problem is getting worse.  We have become so accustomed to buying things that are made of, packaged in, or disposed of in plastic.  Many of the places that were pristine just a decade or two ago, are all showing signs of plastic pollution.  The stuff just doesn’t break down very quickly.  There are many negative consequences to this plastic problem.  They pollute the water we drink, leaching synthetic estrogens in the water that have been linked to many different types cancer. They collects in nooks and crannies everyone, making beautiful places ugly.  They ensnare animals of all types, killing or maiming birds, turtles and insects.  They are making us all sick in so many ways.  So, what to do about it?

I believe that the best medicine is consciousness.  If we cultivate awareness of a problem it is easier to begin exploring and implementing real solutions.  In the case of plastics or other waste, we can all ask ourselves what is the benefit of buying something that has a real and lasting negative impact on the world around us?  Is the benefit only that we save a little money or have a little more convenience?  If so what would it take to choose another option.  For instance the idea of using reusable bags to take our groceries or other items home.  So instead of relying on paper or plastic that then has to be thrown away or recycled, you can use a sturdier option.  All it takes is getting in the habit and remembering to bring the bag along.  My wife and I leave a few bags in the car just in case we need to stop and pick up a few groceries. We also recently looked at all of the packaged goods we buy at the store and are looking at ways that we can reduce the amount of things we purchase in packages.  For instance, we love to drink kombucha, but the bottles collect quickly, so we started brewing our own again.  It takes a little time in the beginning, but it saves us time and the hassle in disposing/recycling all of those bottles.  It also saves us money. Speaking of money, the way we spend our money is another way to help change the amount of waste we create.  

When I take the time to consider all of the things I consume, I am always a little shocked to notice all of the choices that I make with my money.  Though it seems that we are unable to control so many things in our lives, we have control over what we buy.  Companies make choices about what they produce, how they package, and how they market.  Consumers make their preferences know to the producers with their purchases.  You can see this when you go shopping.  Twenty years ago if you went into the supermarket, you would have found few “green” cleaning products or gluten free items.  This has changed now as the customer has changed the way they shop.  We can all buy things from companies that value the health of  the environment as much as profit.  

We are all living parts of the web of life on planet earth.  The more awareness we bring to the impact our decisions have on our lives, and the lives of those around us, the better health we all get to enjoy for the present day and tomorrow as well.

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Ann Zimmerman, LAc.

Ann was born and raised in a small town in Northern Indiana where she grew up among many generations of her family. The large influences of her childhood and young adult life came via her passion for soccer and traveling. Thru many years of playing soccer she learned about the physical limitations of the body and how to be part of a team, leading her to an athletic scholarship at the University of Florida. Having had the opportunity to travel at a young age illuminated Ann’s curiosity and respect for the diversity among people, systems of medicine, religions, landscapes, etc. It was after her first trip to Asia that her passion for eastern medicine and and philosophy was officially ignited. This trip also sparked an interest in the practice of yoga, meditation, and herbs, eventually leading to her undergraduate major of Cultural Anthropology. After college, Ann knew she wanted to help people and to work with plants. This led her to Chinese medicine. After a personal healing experience using acupuncture she knew she had found her path.

After four years of study, she received a Master’s degree from the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine. Upon completion of the program she married her study buddy and co-owner of Middleway Medicine, Clark Zimmerman and the two of them set out on a 6 month study/honeymoon in Asia. In 2005, they founded Middleway Medicine Acupuncture and Herbal clinic and began their healing work in Talent, Oregon. Middleway offers the service of individualized care based on Traditional Chinese medical diagnosis, using the tools of acupuncture, herbal medicine, shiatsu, nutrition, and lifestyle counseling.

Ann is NCCAOM certified and state licensed in Oregon to practice acupuncture and herbal medicine.

She is nearly fluent in Spanish, and is a certified Qigong instructor.

She has continued her studies with a focus on Women’s health; menses, fertility, pregnancy, and menopause and a strong emphasis on meditation, nutrition, and personal development.

She feels her strength as a healer is her sincerity to be present and compassionate with each of her patients. 

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Rest and Digest

by Ann Zimmerman, LAc.

Despite knowing that it’s winter; cold, dark and “normal” to slow down this time of year, I often fall into the trappings of the mind assuming my energy should be the same all year long. Unless you have seasonal work or are retired, most of us continue to work the same hours at our jobs, run the same errands, keep the same schedule with childcare and attempt to maintain the same routines.  Treating ourselves as if we are energetically the same in every season comes at the cost of our natural internal rhythm. When we do not cooperate with our internal rhythms its like swimming against the current and life gets very tiring.

So how do we slow down in the winter if we are required to keep the same schedule as if it was spring? For these kind of answers we can rely on our intuition and  wisdom traditions.  In the wisdom tradition of Traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) winter represent the most YIN aspect of the year. Yin is our  dark, cold, slow, inward energy. This can be compared to YANG energy which is upmost during Summer, light, warm, fast, outward energy.  Winter is the time for your diet and activities to nourish your yin energy.  In TCM, each organ is associated with a season and the Kidneys are associated with Winter. The Kidneys in TCM hold our most basic and fundamental energy(they are like your bodies battery). Rest is very important for charging your batteries, this is why we crave it more in the winter and why some animals hibernate. This is also the time to look inward, taking time to be reflective in a stillness practice such as meditation or journaling, . Allowing ourselves to rest and store our energy nourishes the kidneys and charges your energy battery. This can be likened to the trees and plants that send their energy down into their roots.

Translating this wisdom into our modern lives and daily practice is the challenge. I believe that giving yourself the  permission to go slower and expect less external work to be done is the first place to start with nourishing your Yin. This simple yet profound practice of participating with nature allows you to make smarter choices with your energy.  The next piece is minimizing extra commitments, this is the not the time of year to say yes to more things to do. Say yes to yourself, to doing less, sleeping more and being reflective.  Diet and exercise always plays a big part in our lives. Choose foods that are in season and cooked slowly for a long time.  Winter roots, soups, bone broth and herb tonics our food for the soul and kidneys. Be willing to change up your exercise routine on behalf of the season. Perhaps you do the same exercise but in a different way. Prioritize your sleep! If you miss sleep find a way to catch up the next night or over the weekend.

Taking the time during winter to rest and digest allows you to grow strong during the rest of the year and have plenty of energy.

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