Middleway Medicine Blog

Healthy Herbal Coolers

Healthy Herbal Teas That keep You Hydrated in the Heat

Here in Southern Oregon the heat is upon us and the summer is just getting started.  In this post Oliver Leonetti L.Ac,  the owner of Inner Gate Acupuncture in Portland Oregon, shares two great tea recipes that use Chinese herbs to help keep you hydrated and healthy this summer.

Summer is a great time to be outside enjoying the landscape and beauty that Southern Oregon has to offer. Here are two natural recipes with Chinese herbs for real thirst quenching. These herbs have heat relieving and hydrating properties that are far better than over-sweetened commercial products.

These teas are great for hikes, workouts or just as daily thirst quenchers. These can be brewed at home and transported in reusable bottles to limit the environmental impact of plastics. These teas also provide electrolytes and minerals to replace those lost through perspiration and activity.

Mint and Chrysanthemum Tea:

Ingredients:
1 cup – Mint leaves – Dried or fresh.
1 cup – Dried Chrysanthemum flowers

Directions: 
Bring 4 cups of water to boil and remove from the heat.
Add herbs and steep for about 10 minutes.
Strain herbs
Add 6 cups of water or ice.
A natural sweetener or fresh mint can be added for taste.

Notes:
Mint is traditionally used to clear heat from the head and eyes. Its cooling nature helps relieve heat rashes and headaches.

Chrysanthemum is traditionally used to lessen allergy symptoms, reduce fevers, headaches and relieve red swollen eyes. 

Goji Melon Cooler:

Ingredients:

1 cup     Goji berries 
2 cups – Watermelon juice
2 cups – Aloe vera juice

Directions:
Bring 4 cups of water to a boil.
Reduce to a simmer
Add goji berries and simmer for 10 minutes
Strain herbs and allow it too cool fully
Add Aloe juice and watermelon
Add 5 cups of water or ice
A natural sweetener or fresh mint can be added for taste.

Notes:
Goji Berries are a great all-around tonic. They have been used traditionally to strengthen the body and the eyes and they are full of vitamins and minerals.
Watermelon, especially the white rind part, has great cooling and hydrating properties. It is used traditionally to reduce heat stroke.
Aloe Vera Juice has been traditionally used for cooling the body and skin. It’s also great for constipation, and red eyes.

Enjoy!

Click Here to learn more about Oliver Leonetti L.Ac. and Inner Gate Acupuncture

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SPEED

by Ann Zimmerman, LAc.

After finding our farm truck with a dead battery due to a lack of use. I started reflecting on the balance point between resting (not too much or the battery dies) and resting enough to get a full charge on our life battery.  

The hallmark of today’s culture is Speed–do more things at a faster pace. We often don’t rest until our batteries run out, or we get sick.  Chinese medicine gives us the poetic language to describe this as a need for YIN. YIN is the restorative, quiet, still part of life.  YIN is the night, and YIN is the winter time of year. We crave what is reflected in nature. And right now nature is underground, hibernating, and recharging her battery.

After this busy holiday time when we are having some of the longest nights of the year, how can we each honor our yin more? How can we take more time to rest deeply and to luxuriate in the stillness. To willingly sit still and let the pace of our culture pass us by while we choose to rest.

If more than 90% of illness is caused by stress, we can safely assume much of this is due to the  SPEED of our culture and our addiction to doing things.  I invite you to do less. Give yourself permission to take advantage of this quiet part of the year. 

10 ideas for slowing down

1. Go to bed earlier

2. Have a nightly curfew for your phones/screens/media….off by 8 pm for example

3. Limit your phone use in time and frequency…check it 3x per day–max

4. Schedule less social engagements

5. Spend 20 minutes daily in a stillness practice

6. Exercise regularly, but less vigorously

7. Less caffeine and sugar

8. Sleep-in later

9. Take tonic herbs for your immune system

10. Use candle light, aroma therapy, body oils, and hot baths for restoration

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Stress Reduction

by Ann Zimmerman, LAc.

STRESS REDUCTION
Most of us can attest to the fact that stress is reaching epidemic proportions in modern society. Balancing work, family, health, money, etc. is a challenge that many of us feel ill equipped to face. Eighty percent of the doctor visits in our country are stress related. Our quality of life and health is largely determined by how we adapt and relate to daily stressors. Excessive stress not only takes its toll on our bodies, but strips the joy out of life and suppresses our creative instincts. Dissolving stress is certainly possible, but takes a commitment to making lifestyle choices that create balance throughout our lives. Here are a few ancient techniques for eliminating stress, increasing energy, and creating emotional balance. These are some of the most powerful tools we have for achieving optimal health and preventing future disease.

1) Meditation: Practiced for thousands of years in many Asian cultures, meditation has long been recognized as one of the most powerful tools we have for cultivating peace of mind and balance. Numerous studies have proven the incredibly positive effect that meditation has on stress reduction. There are literally hundreds of meditation techniques taught around the world. For beginners, the most helpful approach is to start with basic mindfulness techniques that develop both relaxation and alertness. Once a basic ground of awareness has been stabilized, then more advanced meditation practices can be undertaken. Meditation is a practice that helps us identify with stillness and silence. It cultivates intuition and surrender. It can deeply help just about anybody, but is truly a miraculous practice for reducing stress and anxiety.

2) Yoga: This ancient practice has also been utilized by millions of people throughout history. Yoga is typically considered a form of meditation that involves putting the body into a variety of poses in combination with deep breathing to induce mental clarity, increased energy, and physical strength and flexibility. The healing benefits of yoga have been repeatedly documented by a variety of clinical studies. There are many forms of yoga and it is best to experiment to determine which form feels the most suited for your needs. 

3) Acupuncture: One of the pillars of traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture has been practiced for at least 2,500 years. Perhaps one of the last truly holistic forms of healthcare remaining on the planet, acupuncture works with the Qi (life force ) of the body in order to induce a variety of therapeutic effects. The safety and efficacy of this practice are well documented which accounts for its incredible surge in popularity in the Western world. Acupuncture is considered one of the most powerful treatment options for stress reduction. 

4) Herbal medicine: There are a variety of both Chinese and Western herbal formulas that have been clinically proven to reduce stress and create emotional balance. Herbs are much less concentrated than pharmaceuticals, which is why they have far less side effects (but can still be as effective). If you are interested in using herbal medicine we recommend consulting an herbalist.  It can be quite overwhelming trying to self diagnose accurately in the supplement aisle.

5) Nutrition: Eating a diet high in antioxidants, essential fatty acids, and low glycemic carbohydrates can go a long way toward healing stress. The standard American diet (high in processed foods, saturated fat, sugar, and trans-fats) has been linked to anxiety, depression, and increased stress in numerous studies. Change your diet to an organic, whole foods approach and both your body and mind will reward you beyond measure. Poor adaptability to stress is often a sign that our brains are starving for nutrients that we aren’t getting from our standard American diets.

Making these lifestyle changes may not be easy in the initial phases. It is often helpful to seek out the support of a health care practitioner to guide you through these transitions. Once you start feeling the enormous payoff of making such changes, there truly is no turning back. Your stress will dissolve, your weight will decrease, and your energy will skyrocket, not to mention the preventative measures you are taking for heart health. Isn’t that enough to warrant making a few changes?

 
 
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